San Diego Museum of Art / Summer Salon Series

“A Different Look at the Permanent Collection”
Intervention
San Diego Museum of ArtSummer Salon Series
July 8, 2010

I was invited to participate to the Summer Salon Series at the San Diego Museum of Art. Each artist or group of artists was invited for a one night event, held every Thursday during the whole summer. My project revolved around the use of the permanent collection of the museum. Everything was specially made for that evening.


A Different Look at the Permanent collection” is based on a selection of pieces constituting the museum’s permanent collection.

“The Bedroom Series” / Vacancy 3

Vacancy 3 / One night / One empty Apartment / San Diego, CA.
July 11, 2010

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26 photos of bedrooms taken by 26 different artists, each print is 11×19″.

Vacancy is an interesting concept developed by Lori Lipsman. Some time to time a tenant leaves an apartment she owns in North Park. She then organizes – with not much time – a “one night” or “one day” show with a group of artists, dividing the apartment into spaces for different projects. Last time, for Vacancy 2, I’ve got the living room, this time I’ve got the bedroom. It is an exciting project to work on.

“The Bedroom Series “
Having the space of the (empty) bedroom in the vacant apartment, I decided it would be interesting to ask a group of artists/friends to send me a jpeg of their bedroom. There was no special requirements except sending a photo of the bedroom where one can see the bed and to send a jpeg large enough to be printed with a good definition. I really am interested in “site-responsive” installations, something the Vacancy series seems to be made for!

Artists participating: Irene Abraham, Janie Altmann, Richard ChauDavis , Guillaume Cherel, Armando de la Torre, Andrea Chamberlin, Jean et Julia Dubranna-Uitz, Sam Frazier, Janine Free, Christine Freitas, Richard Gleaves, Carol Graber, Michele Guieu, Craig Kane, David Krimmel, Lori Lipsman, Michael Maas, Eric Meyer, Jfre Robot Coad, Ronaldo P., Wendy and Michael Ruiz , Ivan Sigg, Drew Snyder, Anna Stump, Katherine Sweetman, Maura Vazakas.

San Diego Museum of Art / Summer Salon Series

“A Different Look at the Permanent Collection”
Intervention
San Diego Museum of ArtSummer Salon Series
July 8, 2010

 
 

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I was invited to participate to the Summer Salon Series at the San Diego Museum of Art.Each artist or group of artists was invited for a one night event, held every Thursday during the whole summer. My project revolved around the use of the permanent collection of the museum. Everything was specially made for that evening.

I had banners made specially for the occasion, made a video (projected inside), projected images on the outside walls of the museum, had a workshop for people to participate to, invited a group of music, and a silk-screen printed who printed t-shirts on the spot as give aways.


A Different Look at the Permanent collection“is based on a selection of pieces constituting the museum’s permanent collection.

The people could chose between a t-shirt or a limited edition print (limited editions of 10 each on BFK Rives – 30 prints in total). One is the facade of the museum, one is based on “Mandragora” by Diego Rivera, the third one is based on “After many days” by Thomas Hart Benton.

My workshop took place in Gallery 16. The idea for the people participating to the workshop was to chose a painting which inspires them. To chose a detail or the whole painting and to make an interpretation in black and white of the chosen part. To keep only a few details. They had to draw shapes on a black card stock. Then they could cut the shapes and glue them on a white card stock. I would then take a picture of the person and her piece, in front of the chosen painting.

People told me it was great to work in that beautiful room, it was a “zen” workshop, engaging and open. I had a great time talking to people about the piece they were making. They were happy to be there and to share the moment. The quality of the work was amazing and the final “gallery” was really a beautiful piece!

video Lori Lipsman

“Correspondences and Elevation” at the San Diego Art Institute

An Installation of Paintings
San Diego Art Institute / Balboa Park / San Diego, CA
June 18 – July 18, 2010

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“Correspondences and Elevation” is a 40×12′ installation of paintings, from floor to ceiling. Each painting is either 60″x36″, 48″x36″ or 36″x36″. The series shown in this exhibition is comprised of paintings inspired by the Pacific ocean and the desert surrounding San Diego, where Michele Guieu lives. Her paintings question the relationship between the human beings and nature which echoes the catastrophe of the massive oil spill happening right now in the Gulf of Mexico.

Seas, oceans and deserts have always been part of Guieu’s life. She was born in Marseille, a French town on the Mediterranean sea. She then lived in Dakar for several years, on the Atlantic Ocean and in the Saharan desert. When living in Paris, she would often go to the Atlantic Ocean. Living in California, she now finds inspiration in both the Pacific Ocean and the surrounding deserts. She spends time watching people walking on the beach. In the desert, the people in the paintings are mostly her family.

Guieu is profoundly attached to empty landscapes and spaces. This attachment was given to her by her father at a young age. “The Flower of Evil”, where one can find “Elevation” and “Correspondences” was the first book of poems her father gave to her when she was in her early teens. She read “Elevation” at his funeral.

These two poems are a hymn to nature and also carry nostalgia and sadness for a lost paradise, which echoes what is happening right now in the Gulf of Mexico..

Michele Guieu takes photos wherever she goes. She then work these photos in Photoshop, keeping only the essential elements. In the end she paints the images on large canvases.

“When I started to organize the pieces that now constitute this series, I used canvases that were identical in height but variable in width. They fit together both physically and in content, like stanzas of a poem. Some of these paintings were originally created as diptychs, and the diptychs appear in their entirety here.

The arrangement and composition of this group of paintings invites change. This composition could absorb new paintings; pieces could be reorganized and presented differently in spaces of different proportions.

For this exhibition, I considered the dynamics of the space first and experimented with the size of the wall and the scale of the art, and the way one can read the piece as a whole from a distance and read each element when being up close.

Each element is a result of my experiments with outdoor spaces. This exhibition is an opportunity for me to experiment with bringing these elements into a relationship with indoor space.

I borrowed the title “Correspondences and Elevation” from two of my favorite Baudelaire poems. Those poems express a connection to a sequence of scenes from a life and a living landscape.”

“Correspondences” by Charles Baudelaire
“Elevation” by Charles Baudelaire

“Living Room with Ghost and no TV” / Vacancy 2

Vacancy 2 / group show
One Night / One vacant apartment / 15 artists
February 5, 2010

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About “Living Room with Ghost and no TV” or “Watching the campfire”

I worked in the living room. I created a mural about the “TV room”. TV is usually the central element at people’s houses. I personally do not watch TV but I wanted to use one as a “fireplace”, with a video of a campfire I took in Anza Borrego Desert a few weeks ago, when we were camping. So one TV is working, the other one is empty. 2 men are watching.

Sprinkled on the walls are a series of photos taken during dinner time, birthday parties, at family and friends’, at moments where the TV is turned off. Some small paintings are also on the wall.

I worked three days on the installation, and the show was only for one night. Then I painted the walls back to white.

The exhibition took place at Lori Lipsman‘s who curated and organized it. Four artists had one room each. A special project took place in the kitchen, the “Leftovers Project”. The concept for that project was to re-work some piece already made and transform it for the event.